New York City Personal Injury Law Blog

Tips To Keep You Safe On Halloween

Posted on Nov 4, 2017 in Car Accidents

Halloween is perhaps one of the most fun and exciting days of the year. Dressing up and going trick or treating is one of the many highlights of this holiday. However, accidents can occur during this time of the year as well, making it extremely important to be careful.

Of all the dangers that come with Halloween, car accidents occur most often. Children are more than two times likely to be killed in a Halloween car accident. Fires and accidents that cause eye, hand, and finger injuries are also common during this time of the year.

Halloween Safety Tips

Here is a look at a few safety tips to keep you and your children safe this Halloween:

  • Cross streets cautiously: Drivers can have a difficult time seeing trick-or-treaters after dark. This is why you should make sure that you and your children cross streets at corners. It is also important to teach your children to avoid crossing a street by moving out in between parked cars. If a child steps out between parked cars to cross a street, drivers may not see them and stop too late, resulting in a serious accident.
  • Stick to sidewalks: When you or your children are out trick or treating, you should always remember to walk on sidewalks as much as possible. If you cannot do this, make sure that you walk facing traffic and as far to the side of the road as you can. Following this simple tip can keep you and your loved ones safe while you are going from house to house and collecting treats.
  • Make yourself visible: Trick or treating is commonly done after dark. Due to this, it is important to make sure that you and your children are visible to avoid any potential accident. Make sure that the group carries glow sticks or flashlights to make them more visible to motorists. Lastly, if the color of your costume is dark, it is a judicious idea to stick reflective tape. The more visible you are to drivers, the safer you are from car accidents.
  • Drive slowly and carefully: If you are planning to drive somewhere during the hours that people are out trick or treating, you should be on high alert, especially for children. You should be particularly alert and careful when you are backing out of a driveway. Drive slowly if you are going through a residential area, especially if you see parked cars on the street. Last but not least, ensure that you have your headlights on so that pedestrians can see you and vice versa.

No One Knows Personal Injury Cases Like RMFW Law

If you or a loved one has been injured while celebrating Halloween due to someone else’s negligence or carelessness, one of the first things you should do is contact a reliable and experienced personal injury attorney at Rosenberg, Minc, Falkoff, & Wolff of RMFW Law to review your case. If you have a viable case, you can file a personal injury lawsuit against the negligent party and obtain compensation for your injuries and other damages. Call us at 212 697 9280.

Let’s get started now! If someone was negligent, they should pay. If someone has cost you pain and money because of their apathy, they should be held accountable. Call RMFW Law today!

We have won lots of cases for previous clients, and we are winning cases now – there is no reason why you cannot be a part of our winning team and one of our clients who has come out on top because they chose to give RMFW Law a crack at their case. Let’s hear what you have to say. Call us now!

 

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I referred Rosenberg, Minc, Falkoff & Wolff to a friend needing help with a birth injury & medical malpractice case. Having worked with founding partner Daniel Minc myself on a car accident case, I was sure they would be able to deliver results.

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